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Philosopher Dr. Aleksandr Dugin joins the program today to expound on Trump's swamp metaphor

On the Tuesday, Feb. 7th 2017 transmission of the Alex Jones Show, an MSNBC host compares Trump to Putin and says he may start killing journalists. And overwhelming evidence shows Trump was right about massive voter/election fraud. Philosopher Dr. Aleksandr Dugin joins the program today to expound on Trump's swamp metaphor and provide his take on Putin and Trump as two poles of a new world vision. On today's show we also welcome University of California Professor Darrell Y. Hamamoto to discuss the riots at UC Berkeley over the weekend, and the California secession movement.

The Fourth Political Theory & Blind Western Liberalism

Alexandr Dugin - Hour 1 - The Fourth Political Theory & Blind Western Liberalism

March 27, 2015
Aleksandr Dugin is one of the best-known writers and political commentators in post-Soviet Russia. In addition to the many books he has authored on political, philosophical and spiritual topics, he currently serves on the staff of Moscow State University, and is the intellectual leader of the Eurasia Movement. For more than a decade, he has also been an advisor to Vladimir Putin and others in the Kremlin on geopolitical matters, being a vocal advocate of a return of Russian power to the global stage, to act as a counterweight to American domination. Dugin joins us to speak about the subject of his book, The Fourth Political Theory. He begins with an overview of this political vision, one that is a fundamental criticism of liberalism in all forms, but does not fall into communism, nationalism or fascism. Dugin explains the need for critically thinking people in the world to imagine an alternative to liberalism, and how this very confusing and destructive ideology is truly a totalitarian way of thinking. We consider the key liberalist issues as being tests to see how far people are willing to go to completely give up traditional values, and we look at the globalist capital system that is exacerbating the identity crisis of the west. In the second half, Dugin details the fine points of Eurasianism, a vision of world history based on geopolitics and the virility of diverse civilizations. We look at Russia’s place amongst the global elite, her unwavering sovereignty that will ultimately resist globalization, and a deeply rooted cultural dimension that cannot be divided from Europe. Dugin speaks of the US’s constant meddling and manufacturing of conflicts between Russia and Europe, and we discuss the importance of creating a strong European cooperative to balance the liberalist power monopoly. In conclusion, Dugin notes his contributions to Putin’s current ideology and the rising influence of the Forth Political Theory in liberating Russia from the globalist grip.

http://www.redicecreations.com/radio/2015/03/RIR-150327.php

Who is Alexander Dugin?

Vladimir Putin's name is known throughout the world. Alexander Dugin's name, not so much. But to people in the know, Alexander Dugin is a very important name, as the Russian public intellectual says what Putin thinks. The Agenda examines the man who has been called "Putin's brain." Does two personalities really know each other? How close they are? What is the extent of Dugin's influence. Political analyst Michael Millerman the translator of many Dugin's works into American tries to answer those questions. But the question rests: is the Fourth Political Theory advocated by Dugin really affect Russian politics? Judging on the influence of Eurasian ideas it should.

Clashing Visions

There are more modern democracies in the world than there were 50 years ago, but confidence in the institutions of those democracies - parliaments, elections, politicians - appears to be waning. How much trust do citizens have in the hallowed symbols of democratic rule? Are we confident enough to think that democracies should be established in countries which have remained immune to its charms like Russia and China? Francis Fukuyama, Alexander Dugin and Ivan Krastev join Steve Paikin to debate the current state of Western democracies and how differing perceptions about them are causing geopolitical conflicts.

4PT short film

In today's world, the impression is growing that politics has ended – at least the politics that we used to know. Liberalism stubbornly fought it out with its political enemies, which had offered alternative recipes – with conservatism, monarchism, traditionalism, fascism, socialism, and communism – and, finally, at the end of the 20th century, it beat them all. It would have been logical to surmise that politics would become liberal, while all of liberalism's opponents, having turned up on the periphery, would begin to rethink strategies and to form a new front: the periphery against the centre (Alain de Benoist). But at the beginning of the 21st century everything followed a different script.

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